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Benefits of recent improvements in vehicle fuel economy on overall fuel consumption and emissions
For the past several years, we have calculated (on a monthly basis) the average, salesweighted fuel economy of all light-duty vehicles (cars, pickup trucks, vans, and SUVs) sold in the U.S. The results indicate that, from October 2007 to September 2012, the average fuel economy has improved by 18...
Carbon capture in vehicles a review of general support, available mechanisms, and consumer acceptance issues.
This survey of the feasibility of introducing carbon capture and storage (CCS) into light vehicles started by reviewing the level of international support for CCS in general. While there have been encouraging signs that CCS is gaining acceptance as a means to reduce carbon emissions, the overall...
LEDs and power consumption of exterior automotive lighting implications for gasoline and electric vehicles.
This study evaluated the power consumption of traditional and LED-based exterior lighting systems on passenger vehicles, examining nominal consumption as well as realistic consumption based on real-world usage patterns of various lighting equipment. The results indicate that an all-LED system...
PHEV marketplace penetration An agent based simulation.
Energy security and climate change issues have increased the call for improved energy efficiency from all sectors of the economy, especially the transportation sector. While vehicle manufacturers can in principle make their current vehicle offerings more fuel efficient, historically they have not...
Distance driven and economic activity in the individual U.S. States: 1997-2011.
During these times of heightened concern about energy and the environment, it is desirable to have relatively high economic activity per unit of driving. Thus, this study examined the current variations among the U.S. states and the District of Columbia in GDP per distance driven and the recent...
Making driving less energy intensive than flying
This report analyzes recent trends in the amount of energy needed to transport a person in the U.S. a given distance either in a light-duty vehicle or on a scheduled airline flight. After observing that the energy intensity of driving (BTU per person mile) is 57% greater than that of flying,...
Fuel and money saved using tires with low rolling resistance
This study was designed to examine how using tires that are at the current extremes of rolling resistance affects fuel consumption by light-duty vehicles in the U.S. The analysis was based on rolling-resistance measurements for 63 tire models that were obtained under uniform test conditions by...
Reducing truck fuel use and emissions: tires, aerodynamics, engine efficiency, and size and weight regulations
This report explores ways in which the properties of trucks and regulations governing them might be modified to improve freight efficiency and reduce fuel use and emissions in the challenging world of transportation economics and environmental stewardship. Trucks are the dominant mode of non-bulk...
Fuel-economy distributions of purchased new vehicles in the U.S. :  model years 2008 and 2014
We have recently shown that the average EPA-rated fuel economy of purchased, new, light-duty vehicles in the U.S. improved from 20.8 mpg for model year 2008 vehicles to 25.3 mpg for model year 2014 vehicles. This report provides information about the changes in the sales-weighted distributions of...
Energy intensities of flying and driving 
Last year, I issued a report comparing energy intensities of flying and driving from 1970 through 2010. The main finding of that study was that, while flying domestically in the U.S. used to be much more energy intensive than driving, that is no longer the case. Indeed, in 2010—the last year...