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Unemployment rate and price of gasoline predict the fuel economy of purchased new vehicles
This study examined the relationship between two economic indicators-the unemployment rate and the price of gasoline-and the fuel economy of purchased new vehicles. A regression analysis was performed on U.S. monthly data from October 2007 through February 2011. The main finding is that the fuel...
Has motorization in the U.S. Peaked?
This study examined recent trends in the numbers of light-duty vehicles (cars, pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans) in the U.S. fleet. The analysis considered both the absolute numbers and the rates per person, per licensed driver, and per household. The period examined was from 1984 through 2011. The...
Has motorization in the U.S. peaked? Part 2: use of light-duty vehicles.
The main contribution of this study is an examination of recent trends in distances driven by light-duty vehicles(cars, pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans) in the U.S. fleet. This is in contrast to several other recent studies that analyzed distances driven by all vehicles(including medium and heavy...
Marketing implications of the changing age composition of vehicle buyers in the U.S.
This study examined the differences in the probability of licensed drivers purchasing a new light-duty vehicle (car, pickup truck, SUV, or minivan) as a function of their age. Data analyzed were for 2007 and 2011. Both relative and absolute probabilities were examined. The main results are as...
Distance driven and economic activity in the individual U.S. States: 1997-2011.
During these times of heightened concern about energy and the environment, it is desirable to have relatively high economic activity per unit of driving. Thus, this study examined the current variations among the U.S. states and the District of Columbia in GDP per distance driven and the recent...
Has motorization in the U.S. peaked? Part 3, fuel consumed by light-duty vehicles
This study examined recent trends in fuel consumption by light-duty vehicles (cars, pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans) in the U.S. fleet. The period examined was from 1984 through 2011. This is a follow-up study to Sivak (2013a; 2013b), in which I analyzed the corresponding trends in the number of...
Has motorization in the U.S. peaked? Part 4, households without a light-duty vehicle
Recent studies have shown that—per person, per driver, and per household—we now have fewer light-duty vehicles, we drive each of them less, and we consume less fuel than in the past. These trends suggest that motorization in the U.S. might have reached a peak several years ago. The present...
Has motorization in the U.S. peaked? Part 5: update through 2012
In three of the previous four reports in this series, I examined the changes from 1984 to 2011 in the number of registered light - duty vehicles, and the corresponding changes in distance driven and fuel consumed. The units of the analyses were both the absolute number s and the rates per perso n,...
A survey of public opinion about connected vehicles in the U.S., the U.K., and Australia
This survey ex amined public opinion regarding connected - vehicle technology across three major English - speaking countries — the U.S., the U.K. , and Australia. The survey yielded useable responses from 1,596 persons over the age of 18. The main results were as follows : The majority of...
What do current owners of hybrids and non-hybrids think about hybrids?
This survey examined the views of U.S. motorists concerning hybrid vehicles, both in terms of their current vehicles and future vehicles. The survey yielded completed responses from 1,002 owners of a hybrid and 1,038 owners of a non-hybrid. The main findings related to current owners of a hybrid...

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